Tag Archives: teeth

Risks Associated with Retaining Your Wisdom Teeth

A man with a tooth acheWisdom teeth are the final ones to erupt. These are the third molars on both sides of your upper and lower jaws. They typically develop between 18–25 years and are often problematic, says a dentist from West Jordan.

Wisdom teeth impaction is the most common problem associated with third molars. This refers to teeth that grow sideways, crooked or fail to erupt due to lack of space fully. Apart from impaction, wisdom teeth pose a significant risk of harmful effects to those who choose to keep them. Here are a few of these effects.

Occlusal and Orthodontic Issues

Wisdom teeth can cause unwanted teeth movement since its eruption occurs in adulthood. The existing teeth become crowded and at times twist and overlap. This typically warrants orthodontic treatment.

The movement can also affect your occlusion (bite). This, in turn, stresses your facial muscles and temporomandibular joint, leading to significant orofacial discomfort.

Compromised Oral Health

Harmful bacteria commonly collect on the surface of impacted teeth. This increases the susceptibility of the gums and surrounding teeth to infection. The bacteria can also enter your bloodstream and adversely affect your heart and other body organs.

Nerve Damage

Lower wisdom teeth are closer to the nerves. This affects the taste and feeling on your tongue. They are also close to the neurovascular bundle, which runs in your lower jaw. There is, therefore, a substantial risk of the lower wisdom teeth affecting your nerves and the neurovascular bundle.

Nerves close to your wisdom teeth can also be affected by the removal of wisdom teeth by unqualified personnel. It is hence wise to get your teeth removed by a qualified oral surgeon in a well-equipped clinic.

Most dentists will recommend wisdom tooth removal even if they are causing no problems. This is a preventive measure against possible issues. They are also easy to remove at a young age as their roots have not yet fully developed.

Are Missing Teeth Getting You Down?

Man with Missing TeethIf are you missing one or more teeth, then you may have experienced difficulty with eating or speaking and feel self-conscious about your appearance. Having gaps significantly affects your smile and can lead to a lack of confidence in social situations. Missing teeth can also lead to instability in remaining teeth as they are not properly supported. If you are missing more than one tooth, you may find that your face begins to sag as there is nothing to fill it out. Dental implants have been a great solution for patients who need restorations but are unhappy with the idea of removeable dentures or bridges. Fitting them is carried out under local anaesthetic and the whole process can be carried out in one day in some cases.

A permanent solution

Dental implants have given many people with missing teeth a new lease of life. With implants your smile is restored, you can eat your favourite foods again and you can speak without fear of dentures falling out or your voice sounding strange. With the correct care, your implants can last for several decades so, once they are fitted, you can focus on enjoying your life again.Blue Sky Dentistry in Northern Ireland offers dental implants for full or part replacements and complex cases.

How do dental implants work?

To ensure the best chance of success, your dentist will treat any gum or tooth problems first to make the mouth ready. The implants are small metal screws thatare placed into the jaw during a minor operation. The bones and tiny blood vessels of the jaw mesh around the metal, holding it in place. When they are stable, the implants are used as a secure base for a single replacement tooth, a bridge or a full set of dentures. If the bone in your jaw has deteriorated because of denture use or long-term gaps then techniques such as bone grafting are available. This means that dental implants are available to almost everyone and could be the start of a more enjoyable future and a brighter smile.

Five Things People in the Past Used as Toothbrushes

ToothbrushBefore the invention of the toothbrush, ancient people had to be creative with how they cleaned their teeth. With the invention of agriculture came the introduction of sugar in the human diet, which led to tooth decay.

Even the ancients knew that brushing your teeth regularly is important to keep the mouth healthy. Aesthetic Smiles, a dental practice in Leicester, suggests that you use a soft bristled toothbrush, brushing twice to thrice a day.

People in the past did not have the luxury of gentle, soft bristled toothbrushes. They often had to make do with other things to scrub the plaque off their teeth.

  1. Purple Nutsedge

At an archaeological dig site, scientists discovered that Mesolithic humans ate purple nutsedge to clean their teeth. These prehistoric Sudanese humans ate the weed as food, but it also prevented tooth decay.

  1. Rough cloth

Many ancient humans used a rough cloth to clean their teeth, simply rubbing the fabric over their teeth to get rid of debris.

  1. Salt or chalk

Salt has always been popular for use in debridement. Ancient humans rubbed salt or crushed chalk onto their teeth to clean them. Unfortunately, these also scratched the enamel as they were too hard and rough.

  1. Crushed shell and bone

Similar to how salt and chalk were used, people in the past also crushed oyster shells or bone to scrub their teeth.

  1. Twigs

The ancient Egyptians would snap twigs in two and use the resulting edge as a makeshift toothbrush. The ancient Chinese, on the other hand, chewed on twigs to clean their teeth and to freshen their breath.

The toothbrush is a wonderful invention that we take for granted. The soft bristles are perfect for removing plaque without damaging the enamel. Makeshift toothbrushes in the past were too rough and did more damage than good.